September192014

actualgothicheroine:

Understanding that narratives have a purpose and that writers make decisions for a reason is so important. Narratives include conflicts and resolutions. Conflicts do not always happen between heroes and villains, there are interpersonal conflicts between all kinds of people in all kinds of relationships. Characters have flaws, and having flaws means making mistakes and sometimes hurting others or getting hurt.

When you are, say, constructing a feminist analysis of a story, it’s important to take into account what the message of something seems to be. Is this scene a conflict or problem that has been introduced into this narrative intentionally in order to be addressed and resolved later? OR, is this problem I have noticed not a part of the narrative, but is instead a problem in the writer’s thinking? If this situation is in fact an intended conflict in the story, does the writer successfully approach this problem with respect and understanding of the topic they chose to address?

A problem introduced intentionally into a narrative that is given a resolution and is handled successfully is not a problem. It is a message.

A problem introduced intentionally into a narrative that is handled improperly is a problem that needs attention.

A problem introduced into a narrative unintentionally and is not addressed at all is a problem that needs attention.

A TV Show or other episodic medium resolves some problems at the end of arcs. Some problems require a full understanding of how it was handled, and that means waiting for the finale sometimes.

(via eshusplayground)

10PM
10PM
10PM

allerasphinx:

Earlier, I wrote an email to Alessandra Stanley and the main editorial email (because hey, why not) and received this response:

I’m overusing the word trifling today, but…

Thanks for your email. After consulting with the Arts & Leisure desk, we have concluded that no correction is necessary here. Although Ms. Beharie is indeed the female lead and has appeared in the same number of episodes as Tom Mison, her Lt. Abbie Mills is not the star of the show in the same way the Mr. Mison’s Ichabod is. At any rate, we reserve formal corrections for provable factual inaccuracies; something as subjective as the designation of “sidekick” does not rise to the level that would warrant a correction, I’m afraid.
Nonetheless, please be assured that we have taken your suggestion under serious consideration. Thank you very much for taking the time to get in touch.
Sincerely,
Louis Lucero II
Assistant to the Senior Editor for Standards
The New York Times
image
Excuse?

Read More

(via note-a-bear)

10PM

The Musketeers meets Bob's Burgers 35/?

(via note-a-bear)

6PM

imsirius:

And America is all of us that show up. You know you tilt up the world and it all rolls down into Hollywood to try to be in the movies. But then they want everybody to change their ethnicity, the look they have, to get to this sort of homogenous look - that nobody is born that way - to tell a story. ― Alfre Woodard [x]

(via womanistglasses)

5PM

youcantbaeawaythegay:

cyclonias:

it doesn’t matter how many shows I watch none of them will let me down like Glee let me down

watch Once Upon a Time

(via deemnfic)

5PM

crissle:

pattilahell:

westendblues:

cousinnick:

latenightalaska:

davereziplease:

dietchola:

JESUS CHRIST

“I’m a horrible father”

THE BEST PART IS THE GIRL IN THE MIDDLE JUST SO DONE

AND THE FACT THAT THIS FAMILY IS MORE MULTI CULTURAL THAN A PUBLIC SCHOOL HEALTH CLASS TEXTBOOK

The girl in the middle is just like “Damn it, Dad.”

This is sweet how instead of the other 2 laughing they console the baby and get annoyed w the dad

Lmaooo I forgot how amazing this video is

Never gets old.

(Source: youtube.com, via womanistgamergirl)

5PM
kevinwada:

Sleep Hollow #1 BOOM! Exclusive Cover

kevinwada:

Sleep Hollow #1 BOOM! Exclusive Cover

(via undertheteacup)

5PM

unorthodoxchronicles:

quickjesse:

one of the most adorable moments in the series

Beast boy and cyborg drop everything to make sure that Starfire is comfortable telling jokes. They don’t care that they missed the context, laugh along to make her comfortable, then proceed to make asses of themselves JUST so she can have a good laugh too and feel like she BELONGS.

And that is one of many examples of why the original teen titans series was seriously well fucking written as it showed a very HUMAN kind of emotion, feeling like you don’t fit in and watching a joke go wrong and people not finding you funny, then getting to laugh because the people you chose to open up to were caring enough to make fucking sure you felt like you belonged just for a bit.

(Source: miiyahbinmarten, via thathobbsgirl)

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